WhatDidIDrink

Apr 22

(Source: ourmotherearthblog, via redwingjohnny)

(Source: bikinibottom-hearts, via memewhore)

New Poll Shows Majority Of Texans Support Same-Sex Marriage -

holygoddamnshitballs:

Texas

Well this is a first.

An independent poll from Texas Tech Univeristy has found that 48 percent of Texans are in favor of same-sex marriage, while 47 percent oppose it.

Lone Star Q reports:

“In the past, support for gay marriage in this state was below 40 percent,” said associate…

(Source: towleroad.com)

laboratoryequipment:

Physicists Push Parkinson’s Treatment Toward TrialsThe most effective way to tackle debilitating diseases is to punch them at the start and keep them from growing.Research at Michigan State Univ., published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, shows that a small “molecular tweezer” keeps proteins from clumping, or aggregating, the first step of neurological disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease and Huntington’s disease. The results are pushing the promising molecule toward clinical trials and actually becoming a new drug, says Lisa Lapidus, MSU associate professor of physics and astronomy and co-author of the paper.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/physicists-push-parkinson%E2%80%99s-treatment-toward-trials

laboratoryequipment:

Physicists Push Parkinson’s Treatment Toward Trials

The most effective way to tackle debilitating diseases is to punch them at the start and keep them from growing.

Research at Michigan State Univ., published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, shows that a small “molecular tweezer” keeps proteins from clumping, or aggregating, the first step of neurological disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease and Huntington’s disease. The results are pushing the promising molecule toward clinical trials and actually becoming a new drug, says Lisa Lapidus, MSU associate professor of physics and astronomy and co-author of the paper.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/physicists-push-parkinson%E2%80%99s-treatment-toward-trials

“There is a higher percentage of LGBTQ families raising children in the South than in any other part of the country, yet they are the least protected. You can be fired for being LGBTQ in every southern state, and same-sex couples still face barriers to adoption across the region. There are legal roadblocks at many turns, preventing families from taking care of one another and denying children in need the chance to find a forever loving home. Mississippi just passed a so-called religious freedom bill, which opens the door for even more discrimination against LGBTQ people in that state. This is the climate our families still face in much of the South.” — Gabriel Blau, "Op-Ed: Who Is Sticking Up For Southern LGBT Families?" (via holygoddamnshitballs)

US elections are rigged. But Canada knows how to fix them. -

eviltessmacher:

letterstomycountry:

From the article:

So is it possible to end gerrymandering? Well, the country just north of us managed to pull it off. “Canadian reapportionment was highly partisan from the beginning until the 1960s,” writes Charles Paul Hoffman in the Manitoba Law Journal. This “led to frequent denunciations by the media and opposition parties. Every ten years, editorial writers would condemn the crass gerrymanders that had resulted.” Sound familiar?

Eventually, in 1955, one province — Manitoba — decided to experiment, and handed over the redistricting process to an independent commission. Its members were the province’s chief justice, its chief electoral officer, and the University of Manitoba president. The new policy became popular, and within a decade, it was backed by both major national parties, and signed into law.

Independent commissions now handle the redistricting in every province.  "Today, most Canadian ridings [districts] are simple and uncontroversial, chunky and geometric, and usually conform to the vague borders of some existing geographic / civic region knowable to the average citizen who lives there," writes JJ McCullough. “Of the many matters Canadians have cause to grieve their government for, corrupt redistricting is not one of them.” Hoffman concurs, writing, “The commissions have been largely successful since their implementation.”

The Greedy Obstructionist Plutocrats will never allow it.

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

(Source: sanspanties)

(Source: ironmans, via janesfoster)

(Source: editorialcartoonists.com, via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

I feel like most of my life choices can be summed up with this gif:

zimriya:

image

(via morganlaikes)